Monday, September 29, 2003

St. Mary's apologizes for T-shirt

A Catholic high school in Bismarck apologized for a T-shirt featuring an American Indian character after a complaint from United Tribes Technical College. The shirts' logo depicts a male angel gritting his teeth while using a rope to dangle a loincloth-wearing Indian man with a feather in his hair over a pool of sharks.

Saturday, September 27, 2003

Representative Bill Janklow Pleads Not Guilty in Fatal Collision

Outside were about a dozen protesters. As Mr. Janklow left, some yelled chants that included "No justice, no peace," and "He's a killer."

What do you think? How about sentencing Mr. Janklow to several thousand hours of community service work at Pine Ridge and Rosebud?

States Moving to End Tribes' Tax-Free Sales

State governments say tribal tax-free sales, in stores and on the Internet, deprive them of millions of dollars. Those losses have grown as financially struggling states raise cigarette taxes, driving some smokers to tribal stores. And with the deficit among the states projected to reach more than $50 billion in the next fiscal year, legislators and governors are increasingly trying to collect taxes from Indian businesses.

Thursday, September 18, 2003

Reclaiming the Stolen Faces of Their Forefathers

The Namgis of Alert Bay, British Columbia are seeking the return of a mask from the British Museum. The mask was confiscated in 1921 by a local government Indian agent and a police sergeant during a raid on a potlatch ceremony. These ceremonies were outlawed by the Canadian government from 1884 to 1951 in an effort to repress native language and culture. The British Museum, in its extreme arrogance, feels that their "duty to scholars" is a higher calling than is returning the mask to the Namgis, restoring their cultural heritage and returning stolen property.

Saturday, September 13, 2003

Canadian Indians Challenge Fish Farms in Court

Canadian Indians Challenge Fish Farms in Court

"Clams, prawns, crabs, salmon — we had it all at our fingertips," he recalled. In his view, the culprits are close at hand. "It's all being depleted because of all the algae, the sea lice and the contamination the fish farms are putting in our territory."

It is a common refrain: that the 30 or so salmon farms that float on the bays of the sprawling Broughton Archipelago to the north of Vancouver Island are responsible for every possible pestilence. The farms consist of giant cages that float in the open water and hold large quantities of fish. Their denseness allows disease to spread, and, according to the native people, pollutes nearby waters where other fish swim.

Saturday, September 06, 2003

Fatal Crash Charges Threaten Political Career

Let us hope Bill Janklow has met his match when he finds himself on the other side of the justice system!